Geocaching – a wonderful marketing tool for Rural Destinations

Geocaching is an outdoor activity that is quickly growing in popularity in the U.S. It is often called a “hi-tech treasure hunt” since it involves the use of a handheld GPS unit. Participants plug in coordinates (latitude and longitude) and walk to that location in search of a ‘cache’ which can be as large as a shoebox or as small as a film canister. There are usually small trinkets inside and a log book to record your visit. Geocaching is great for families, individuals, couples and groups looking for a fun reason to explore the outdoors.

It’s a great marketing tool for rural destinations for several reasons. First, it does not require a lot of research or advertising. The website geocaching.com will show you a list of existing geocaches by simply plugging in your zip code. You can find them and place small tokens or marketing collateral such as wooden nickels with your destination logo and website.  Pencils with your logo/website are always welcome as well.

Secondly, I find that local geocachers are very helpful and are willing to help you place a cache. There are rules that geocachers follow in order to have the cache be placed on the Geocache website so I have found it is best to take their advice. This means no placing geocaches within a certain distance of an existing geocache, and as one NY Geocacher with the geocache name of sapience trek told me  “keep the cache free of business names, any sort of interactions with merchants, requirements to go inside a business, promotions, recommendations, that sort of thing and you should be ok.” So while you can promote your downtown area with geocaches, you cannot promote individual stores.

My friend Joshua Noble, Director of Tourism for the  Kingman Arizona Chamber of Commerce started a geocaching program in his town last year. It is located along  the fabled Rt 66 and he has found success with his efforts. As this article in the Kingman Miner newspaper says:

Geocaching may sound like a niche hobby, and it essentially is. But those who practice it are dedicated, and Noble said he has encountered a number of geocachers who go out of their way to find as many caches along their route as they can. “You definitely get a feel for where people are coming from, and it seems to me it enhances the experience and is more likely to bring people back than some text and images in a magazine somewhere,” he said. “Between different materials to put a dozen of these together … it costs me $50, $60. And I’ve already gotten more feedback than I get from ads that are $500 to $1,000.”
The handful of caches Noble has already placed have gotten online kudos from geocachers as far away as Germany and the Czech Republic.
“The nice thing about it is, the crowd you’re bringing in is environmentally conscious and socially conscious,” Noble said.
“They have a sense of respect, because they want to see the hiking trails stay and they want to see these historic sites preserved. So it’s definitely a good group of people to promote to.”

Advertisements

One thought on “Geocaching – a wonderful marketing tool for Rural Destinations

  1. Josh sent me the following after reading my blog post:

    Hey Sally,

    Thanks for the updates. In the heat of the summer (high of 102 today and 107 tomorrow), caching is slow right now, but it has been active in the spring and fall. We have been conducting a 12 month visitor survey since February, coordinated through the Arizona Office of Tourism. The first quarterly data (Feb-Apr) showed that about 4.4% of our travelers where geocaching in the area (not huge, but there is an effect). As the study develops, I’ll let you know what we find

    -Josh

    Joshua Noble

    Director of Tourism

    Kingman Area Chamber of Commerce

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s